His father capitalized on this interest by driving him to short track competitions throughout the northwest United States and Canada, and Ohno won several competitions in his age divisions.

His father wanted to encourage Ohno to develop his skills and, although Ohno was underage, he got him admitted to the Lake Placid Olympic Training Center in 1996 to train full-time for short track. Ohno adjusted his training and made a comeback winning the 1997 U. Senior Championships overall title, taking a gold medal in the 1500 m, a silver in the 300 m, and came in fourth in the 500 m races.

When Ohno was 12, he won the Washington state championship in the breaststroke but preferred inline speed skating over swimming.

If it doesn't have a purpose, we (the athletes) don't consume it. You can be extremely strong, but not convert it to power.

Ohno was born in Seattle, Washington, to a Japanese-born father, Yuki Ohno (大野 幸 Ōno Yuki) and a European American mother, Jerrie Lee.

Since Ohno had been dominant in the meet to this point by winning every race he entered, a win by Davis seemed to be unlikely.

Though Ohno, Smith and Biondo were heavily favored to win the 1000 m, the race ended with Ohno finishing third, Smith second, and Davis at the top of the podium.

His father has stated that it was a struggle balancing his son's desire for independence while helping him reach his potential as a young athlete.

When he was 12 years old, Ohno became interested in short track speed skating after seeing the sport during the 1994 Olympics in Lillehammer.

His father used Inline Speedskating to fill his spare time.

Ohno's days were spent with morning swimming practices, followed by schooling, and finally skating practices in the afternoon.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Congressman Bart Stupak held a press availability this morning with medal-winning U. Olympic athletes Apolo Anton Ohno, Shani Davis, and Allison Baver and Paralympic athlete Allison Jones to discuss the B. Stupak Scholarship, a federally-funded scholarship program designed to provide financial assistance to Olympic athletes.