Fast forward to our days and stevia takes 40% of the sweetener market share in Japan, being used extensively in homes and commercial soft drinks. would you be surprised to learn that the Japanase are also using stevia as a treatment for type 2 diabetes? The Stevia Diabetes Connection Researchers found that One research studying the effects of stevia, aspartame, and sucrose on food intake, satiety, and postprandial glucose and insulin levels found similar results and showed that compared to sucrose or aspartame consumers, human stevia consumers had lower post-meal blood sugar levels and much lower post-meal insulin levels. The stevia-consuming group didn’t have any of the sweet cravings sugar and some alternative sweeteners induce, and their blood-sugar profile was more stable.Another study found some beneficial effect of stevia on diabetes and diabetes-induced renal disorders and concluded that theirrecent research evaluated how stevia affects diabetic rats and discovered that rats fed with doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg a day significantly reduced their fasting blood sugar levels, insulin resistance, triglycerides, alkaline phosphatase and omentin levels.stevioside and steviol stimulate insulin secretion via a direct action on beta cells, and may have a potential role as antihyperglycemic agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.And because obesity, cancer and diabetes are very often associated with insulin resistance and high levels of oxidative stress and inflammation, stevia seems to be a king sweetener not only for diabetics looking for a zero-carb natural sweetener but for a wide array of the population as well. Stevia and Cancer One Japanese study from the studied 50 male and 50 female rats in three groups for a period of two years.

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Researchers impaired the memory of mice through the use of scopolamine (an I’d be very interested to read further studies about the effects of stevia on memory preservation on humans.

Who knows, perhaps an unexpected alternative treatment for Alzheimer was right under our nose all this time?

But most of them are artificial and some are so dangerous they’ve been scientifically documented to induce cancerous tumours and other diseases. Luckily for us, there’s a (not so new anymore) boy in town – Stevia.

This cheap sugar alternative comes directly from the soil, is very easy to grow on your own, and is claimed to be successfuly used for centuries by Latin American natives.

But is stevia good for you as they claim and you can safely put it in your homemade meal replacement shakes?

Or is stevia bad for you like other popular alternative sweeteners and you should avoid it at all cost?

This suggest to us that stevia and diabetes have more to do than we previously thought.

Not only is it a good zero-carb diabetes-friendly alternative for sugar, but it actually helps increasing insulin sensitivity, which is especially helpful for insulin-resistant diabetic people.

Interesting enough, fewer patients in the stevioside-group developed left ventricular hypertrophy, a pathological thickening of the heart muscle.