For example, there are Beach breaks, Reef breaks and Point breaks.

The native peoples of the Pacific, for instance, surfed waves on alaia, paipo, and other such craft, and did so on their belly and knees.

The modern-day definition of surfing, however, most often refers to a surfer riding a wave standing up on a surfboard; this is also referred to as stand-up surfing.

Waves are Left handed and Right Handed depending upon the breaking formation of the wave.

Waves are generally recognized by the surfaces over which they break.

Recently with the use of V-drive boats, Wakesurfing, in which one surfs on the wake of a boat, has emerged.

The Guinness Book of World Records recognized a 78 feet (23.8 m) wave ride by Garrett Mc Namara at Nazaré, Portugal as the largest wave ever surfed.

For hundreds of years, surfing was a central part of ancient Polynesian culture.

Surfing may have first been observed by British explorers at Tahiti in 1767.

Samuel Wallis and the crew members of the Dolphin who were the first Britons to visit the island in June of that year.

Another candidate is the botanist Joseph Banks being part of the first voyage of James Cook on the HMS Endeavour, who arrived on Tahiti on 10 April 1769.

Another prominent form of surfing is body boarding, when a surfer rides a wave on a bodyboard, either lying on their belly, drop knee, or sometimes even standing up on a body board.