Reference in this website to any specific commercial products, process, service, manufacturer or company does not constitute its endorsement or recommendation by the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

dating maine prevention violence-61

The National Domestic Violence Hotline does not endorse or recommend products of services for which you may view a pop-up advertisement on your computer screen while visiting our site.

The Hotline allows other websites to post links to but claims no responsibility for the content and opinions expressed on those pages.

The internet can be a helpful support tool for victims of domestic violence to find information and share their stories. Use a gender-neutral user name on websites and do not share personal information.

You can find many websites devoted to domestic violence by using an online search engine, but the quality and intent of the sites you find have to be determined by you. S., guns are often the weapons of choice for abusers, used in over 50% of all cases of domestic violence homicides.

Content from be used as long as The Hotline is cited as the source.

More than one-third of 10th-graders (35 percent) have been physically or verbally abused by dating partners, while a similar percentage are perpetrators of such abuse.“They have some awareness that this is happening in their school, especially if they're assisting victims periodically,” he said.“If they choose not to take action, for me, they are a bystander.”The study exposed multiple instances of high-school principals seemingly misinformed or uninformed on teen dating violence. are physically abused by dating partners every year.Youth from low-income backgrounds, those from marginalized racial and ethnic groups, and LGBTQ students are at the greatest risk of experiencing such harm. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that adolescents who experienced teen dating violence were more likely than those who didn’t to report being bullied on school grounds and missing school due to feeling unsafe.Further, when principals were presented with several options and asked to identify the largest barrier to assisting student victims, the second most-common response—following lack of training—was that “dating violence is a minor issue compared with other student health issues we deal with.”According to Jagdish Khubchandani, the associate professor of health science at Ball State University and the study’s lead author, some school principals are hampered by faculty and staff without sufficient skills and training; others, meanwhile, mistakenly perceive dating violence as a typical, trivial teenage problem.