The sticking point was ‘hacking’, or kicking an opponent on the leg, which Blackheath FC wanted to keep.

The laws originally drafted by Morley were finally approved at the sixth meeting, on 8 December, and there would be no hacking.

He wrote to The Glasgow Herald on 3 November 1870 to announce that such a fixture would be played at the Oval in 16 days’ time.

“In Scotland, once essentially the land of football, there still should be a spark left of the old fire”, he said.

The Football Association, English football’s governing body, was formed in 1863.

‘Organised football’ or ‘football as we know it’ dates from that time.

Only 12 clubs actually played and there were just 13 matches in total but Wanderers beat Royal Engineers 1-0 before 2,000 spectators at Kennington Oval in a Final described by The Sporting Life as “a most pleasant contest”.

A match between ‘England’ and ‘Scotland’ was another good idea from Alcock.

The rules of the new competition were subsequently drafted and the entries of these 15 clubs were accepted: Barnes, Civil Service, Crystal Palace, Clapham Rovers, Hitchin, Maidenhead, Marlow, Queen’s Park (Glasgow), Donington Grammar School (Spalding), Hampstead Heathens, Harrow Chequers, Reigate Priory, Royal Engineers, Upton Park and Wanderers.

It was a disappointing entry, because The FA had 50 member clubs by that time.

A 4,000 crowd, including a good number of ladies, was present for a 0-0 draw that Bell’s Life saw as “one of the jolliest, one of the most spirited and most pleasant matches that have ever been played according to Association rules”.

County and District Associations, charged with fostering the game and organising clubs in their own areas, sprang into life all over the country between 18.

They were published by John Lillywhite of Seymour Street in a booklet that cost a shilling and sixpence.