The crust of the earth is a vast museum; but the natural collections have been made only at intervals of time immensely remote.

In the sixth chapter I enumerated the chief objections which might be justly urged against the views maintained in this volume. One, namely the distinctness of specific forms, and their not being blended together by innumerable transitional links, is a very obvious difficulty.

I endeavoured, also, to show that intermediate varieties, from existing in lesser numbers than the forms which they connect, will generally be beaten out and exterminated during the course of further modification and improvement.

These contingencies will concur only rarely, and after enormously long intervals.

Whilst the bed of the sea is stationary or is rising, or when very little sediment is being deposited, there will be blanks in our geological history.

This report of fish material from Upper Cambrian rocks further extends the record of the vertebrates by approximately another 40 million years. Repetski, ``A Fish from the Upper Cambrian of North America,'' But, as by this theory innumerable transitional forms must have existed, why do we not find them embedded in countless numbers in the crust of the earth?

It will be much more convenient to discuss this question in the chapter on the Imperfection of the geological record; and I will here only state that I believe the answer mainly lies in the record being incomparably less perfect than is generally supposed; the imperfection of the record being chiefly due to organic beings not inhabiting profound depths of the sea, and to their remains being embedded and preserved to a future age only in masses of sediment sufficiently thick and extensive to withstand an enormous amount of future degradation; and such fossiliferous masses can be accumulated only where much sediment is deposited on the shallow bed of the sea, whilst it slowly subsides.

Both schools of thought despise so-called scientific creationists equally, and both agree that the major gaps are real, that they are true imperfections in the fossil record.

Both schools of thought agree that the only alternative explanation of the sudden appearance of so many complex animal types in the Cambrian era is divine creation, and both would reject this alternative.Centered headers, below, are his categories; the rest are mine. Changes in atmospheric partial pressures of carbon dioxide produce corresponding changes in carbon dioxide solubility. Sloss, [T]his quote only demonstrates that, sometimes, under the right conditions, limestones can form by inorganic processes.Because of these relations, there is a direct connection between atmospheric carbon dioxide and the amount of dissolved calcium ion in sea water. One look at the rest of any texbook on sedimentology, and you will realize that most limestonare not inorganic anyway.It is as though they were just planted there, without any evolutionary history.Needless to say, this appearance of sudden planting has delighted creationists.Bold text represents the part of the passage quoted by Don Patton (my apologies to Lynx users, who may see both bold and italic text as underlined.