It has a Tinder-like feature called "Quickmatch" where you can swipe through people nearby — if you both "liked" each other, it lets you know (although you can chat with them either way, unlike on Tinder).

)We've all been that person who's standing in the corner of the bar on a Friday night fiendishly swiping left and right — whether it's because we're bored, drunk, or lonely is irrelevant.

Even if you're surrounded by people, thanks to dating apps, there's now the undeniable feeling that you could be missing out on someone better who's only a few subway stops away.

Plus it's never a bad thing to remind women that they're in control of their own bodies, despite what many gross trolls would have them believe.

This app could basically be renamed "Stalkr," but that doesn't stop it from being a personal favorite of mine.

CMB functions a little differently than Tinder: You get only one match — called a "bagel" — a day, every day at noon (it sends you a push notification to let you know when it's ready).

Then you can either "accept" or "pass" on this person; if you both accept, then a chat line opens up and stays active for a week.

By turning on your location services, the app shows you people you've "crossed paths with," within one city-block.

Then, like Tinder, you can "like" someone which opens up the option to chat.

"I want a man with a personality and looks to take my breath away." These are the requirements of the dark-haired, dark-eyed, 37-year-old Asian beauty who has sent me her romantic wish list.

Reading it on my laptop in the aptly named Cafe Affaire in central London, I consider what she really wants: a no-strings-attached sexual relationship.

If I'm feeling particularly salty about the IRL pool of suitors, I'm comforted by the fact that I could swipe through Tinder until my fingers bleed and still not run out of potential friends/lovers/boyfs.