When asked if he liked actress Keke Palmer, the rapper responded, “Keke Palmer, she straight.I’d bag her, but I don’t really like black girls like that, sorta kinda.” After a firestorm of backlash, the rapper attempted to "clarify" his statement by saying, "it's just not my forte to deal with a "dark skin" woman I prefer them to have a lighter complexion than me #My Preference #Fuck You We also see a lot of famous Black men like actors Taye Diggs and Terrance Howard, and singer Tyrese Beckford routinely chooses not to date Black women and you can't help but wonder why.

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"Because white women were taboo for black men for centuries in this country to the extent that black men could be lynched for the appearance of involvement with white women, access to white women may be more alluring for black men now."Another question that comes up is, "does he really love her?

" Many Black women can't help to think feel as though a great number of Black men choose to date outside of his race for superficial reasons.

So when a Black women ends up with a white man, we are often looked at as not being able to "handle" the Black man, who is himself looked at as the strongest of any group of people.

Mowry-Housley is not the only Black women in the media to be labeled as this.

I'd imagine the great majority of interracial unions are solely based on true love because I couldn't imagine a relationship lasting on anything less than that, but even so, there are still stigmas in the Black community that we have placed on ourselves and interracial relationships.

Now, the question that I don't know the answer to is, is it up to us to change how we view these relationships or will those stigmas wither away when we no longer live under the cloud of white supremacy?

The infamous Black man and white women couple is often a center of conversation in Black groups, and I’m sure people on the outside have always wondered why?

Most would just chalk it up to racism, but is that truly what it is and if so, where did that disapproval come from?

Recently, I have even seen her described online as a bed wench and a mule. S, the Negro bed wench was a Black woman on a plantation whose primary function was to sleep with the white massa. And because of the favorability she received, this woman would generally feel superior to the other women on the plantation.

Often times, in exchange for her sexual acts, the massa would treat her more favorably than the other female slaves--exemption from working in the fields, for example. Today, the term is generally used to describe behaviors one would associate with that of a female “Uncle Tom.” And the "act" of being a Black woman in a relationship with a white man is seen as something someone complicit in the expansion of white supremacy would do.

What’s with the double standard and the disconnect?