"Shorter men will either avoid listing it at all if the app or site allows it." Some even add on a "few bonus inches," says Preece; something he says will only lead to disappointment. Voyer—a psychology and behavioural science professor at London School of Economics — says the allure of height boils down to evolution.He believes that by swiping left on people under a certain height means daters are ruling out "amazing matches" based on "things that don't really matter." Is it really as simple as just being "picky," though? "Height is a sign of health, and we are looking for health characteristics when we look for potential romantic partners," says Voyer.

When we spend so much time swiping through an endless stream of unfamiliar faces, it's easy to get into swiping patterns and even hard and fast rules.

Verity Hogan, e Harmony's relationship and dating expert, says that it's normal to compile wish lists that focus on "aesthetics and surface attributes" but, focusing too much on these qualities when swiping could be to the detriment of our love lives.

(And love, ideally.) If it weren't for the algorithms, I could meet all of these people IRL and they wouldn't know I was 40 unless I showed them my birth certificate — ah, the very idea made me irate.

How dare they reject me before I could reject them! Whether they were the ancient ads I helped beta test as an intern or the old standby OKCupid, I'd invest time and energy into meeting men I wouldn't otherwise come across in my day-to-day life (read: freelancing at home, usually pantless).

" Stephen—who prefers to use only his first name—says his online dating experience was marred by negative interactions about his height.

Stephen, 5ft10, says women would ask him his height straight after matching, and when he told them, they would immediately unmatch.

' to which the response was: 'no, that's absolutely not the same thing,'" says Stephen.

Kunal, 5ft11, says he's had "weird experiences" with online dating because of his height.

There was the ex who brutally dumped me but wouldn't stop emailing me for months, whose presence at dorky work gatherings made me dizzy; the sociopathic film critic whose shoulder I virtually cried on; the go-nowhere first dates; and the great, wide swaths of time spent single, usually pining after some unavailable director or writer who'd relish my attention and nothing else. There were a few things that sent me into a panic about turning 40, but the biggest — looming larger than the golden ring of a book deal or a staff job or, like, finally going back to yoga — was what it meant for me to still be single and actively looking for a partner at that age. If you're not familiar with the exciting world of online dating, sites and apps let you set search parameters that range from location to body type to education and, yes, age range.

Not so much even that I was single, but that I and what that implied. There are plenty of things I simply do not give a single solitary fuck about when it comes to what women my age are supposed to be doing. Just as there are movies on Netflix you might never stumble across in your bleary-eyed scrolling, there are plenty of people you might never see through some whim of programming code.

"I really only swiped right if the guy looked taller than me," says Maahs.