This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County.

For the town in Ulster County, see Rochester, Ulster County, New York.

In 1817, the Brown brothers and other landowners joined their lands with the Hundred Acre Tract to form the village of Rochesterville.

By 1821, Rochesterville was the seat of Monroe County.

In the early 20th century, Rochester became a center of the garment industry, particularly men's fashions.

It was the base of enterprises such as Bond Clothing Stores, Fashion Park Clothes, Hickey Freeman, and Stein-Bloch & Co.

With industrial restructuring in the later 20th century, and the decline of industry and jobs in the area, by 2010, the city's population had declined to 210,565, although the metropolitan area was considerably larger.

The city is about 65 miles (100 km) east-northeast of Buffalo and about 75 miles (120 km) west of Syracuse; it sits on Lake Ontario's southern shore. New York City is about 250 miles (400 km) to the southeast.Several of the region's universities (notably the University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology) have renowned research programs.In addition, Rochester is the site of many important inventions and innovations in consumer products.At the end of the 19th century, anarchist Emma Goldman lived and worked in Rochester for several years, where she championed the cause of labor in Rochester sweatshops.Rochester was also home to significant unrest in labor, race, and antiwar protests.The North Star served as a forum for abolitionist views.