Her new boyfriend had a complicated backstory: He was an American soldier serving in Iraq, and he had a son living in Ghana.

But she had revealed to her new online beau how much she wanted children, and soon his 14-year-old son was emailing her.

She decided to do a little research online and discovered that, yes, cholera is a problem in Ghana, and yes, treating it can be expensive — except that Ghana actually has a free cholera treatment program.

Pierce in 2013 was released from prison after a 13-year prison sentence for theft, trafficking theft and gang activity, according to the news station.

Well, you can’t say she didn’t have this one coming.

But soon after, she learned that the son had had an accident at school and needed help paying hospital bills — urgently.

“Of course I was sending money again to Western Union,” Firefly says.

One day, scrolling through an online forum, she met Wayne Mays (not his real name) from the UK.

Mays is a romance scam-baiter, which means he hangs out on dating sites, posing as a naive love-seeker, with the goal of unmasking — and exhausting — confidence men and women.

According to Mayes, they’ve handled more than 14,000 such cases in the past three years. Go deactivate all your social media accounts,” he says.

In Mays’ experience, romance scammers typically target 30 to 40 people a day, and will eventually move on to easier prey if they encounter resistance.

“My friends advised me to go online and try to find someone to share my life with,” she says via Skype.