Some people have been made to pay tax on their estimated earnings from prostitution, while some have registered as self-employed, to benefit from the rights that taxpayers have. Welfare Prostitution is not considered legal work in Norway.Those entitled to social welfare benefits may claim economical support from NAV when not employed and indigent.

The exchange of sex in one's own home was now legal, but loitering and procurement was not, and women seen selling sex in public were directed to "rehabilitation" programs.

A Pan-Scandinavian conference on prostitution was held in Lillehammer in 1993.

The Norwegian law prohibiting the buying of sexual acts (sexkjøpsloven) came into effect on January 1, 2009, following the passing of new legislation by the Norwegian parliament (Storting) in November 2008.

In early times, proscription of prostitution fell under more general laws on fornication and adultery, particularly after the Reformation.

In deciding whether the offence is gross, particular importance shall be attached to whether the person exposed to the act was under the age of 18, whether gross violence or coercion was used or whether the act led to considerable gain." The Planning and Building Act Specifies requirements for premises where commercial activities take place, used to close massage parlours occupying premises that do not meet the requirements for commercial activities.

Tax and VAT All income is taxable, including income from prostitution, but implementation varies.

when the prohibition of both the sale and purchase of sex was lifted.

However, even during that time, it was actually tolerated and regulated in practice, in the larger cities such as Oslo, Bergen, and Trondheim.

Amongst these were "societies for the defense of moral standards", concerned inter alia with prostitution and the government's failure to deal with it. 13) Brothels were eventually prohibited in Norway in 1887 as part of a pan-European moral reform campaign of Abolitionism that replaced Regulationism and was supposed to end prostitution.

The change in the Penal Code in 1902 did not, however, mean that prostitution was more tolerated by society.

Various institutions stated a desire to rescue 'fallen women', and help them exit their trade and 're-enter society', training them for positions such as domestic servants.