During the week prior, classic music videos from forgotten artists/bands aired, titled Whatever Happened To...?

The channel's playlist was gradually expanding, and, by 1994, included contemporary musicians such as Ace of Base, Melissa Etheridge, Sheryl Crow, Lisa Loeb, Amy Grant, Seal, and other slightly heavier, or more alternative rock-influenced music than what it had originally played, although favorites such as Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Rod Stewart, Cher, Elton John, Madonna, Phil Collins, Janet Jackson, and Céline Dion still continued to receive heavy play for several more years as well. The circle ring surrounding the logo was added in 1998.

A box displaying the minutes past the hour was shown below the logo during the period.

There was also a short-lived hour-long program called By Request in which viewers could call a 1–900 hotline number to request their videos.

Also in 1991, a popular morning program was introduced called Hits News & Weather that ran from 7 AM to 9 AM ET.

More recently, much like MTV, VH1 has been in the area of music-related reality programming, such as Behind the Music, the I Love…

series and the Celebreality block of programming, as part of the channel's current focus on popular culture.

In true Imus style, he used a 1985 segment of his VH-1 show to jokingly call smooth-jazz icon Sade Adu a "grape" for her oval-shaped head.

Typical of VH1's very early programming was New Visions, a series which featured videos and in-studio performances by smooth jazz and classical and new-age bands and performers, including Spyro Gyra, Andy Narell, Mark Isham, Philip Glass, and Yanni.

They would be seen on the Sunday morning 2-hour music video block titled Sunday Brunch.

Once VH1 established itself a few years later, they catered to Top 40, adult contemporary, classic rock, and 1980s mainstream pop.

It was used on VH1 Classic (UK & Ireland) in 1999 to 2010 and VH1 Classic USA in 2000 to 2007 and is still used on VH1 Classic Europe in 2004 to present.

They began airing "History of Music Videos A to Z" during the July 4 weekend from 1994 to 1998 where they would show a large percentage of their library of music videos, which would include mini-marathons of videos by artists with a large number of videos.

(It later expanded to 10 AM ET.) It consisted of music videos both past and present along with a 90-second update of the day's news & weather provided by All News Channel.