I opted for a green-screen monitor though (I later noticed) the Apollo screens had white screens.

updating older hf amplifier-42

Each time that a key is pressed in the terminal window, the key character is sent to the gateway that stores it ready for radio upload to the balloon tracker.

Normally with balloon trackers, they transmit all the time, but instead this tracker sits listening for an uplink, to which it replies immediately.

Most often this is RTTY or (in the USA APRS) but there are alternatives such as Lo Ra which more easily provides a means of reliably transmitting data to the balloon as well as from it.

This greatly expands the range of things we can do during a balloon flight, for example: Another possibility is to run a terminal session between ground (client) and balloon (host), allowing programs to be run on the balloon tracker as requested by a ground station: This could even be used to change the tracker program, or have that program use new configuration parameters.

Periodically, when the tracker receives an uplink it will reply with a telemetry string so that the gateway can upload the balloon position to habitat as usual.

The string is standard except for the addition of some status information about the uplink.

A new puppy solved the first problem by eating one earpad, which prompted me to order the far comfier Large Grado Pads, called the S-cushion and widely available online for –.

The second problem never really was one; every six months or so, I spend 10 seconds threading the earpad back on.

The following diagram shows how this is achieved in software: The Lo Ra gateway is the standard release with modifications added to provide a server socket on a specified port, to which any network terminal program (e.g. In this case I have written a simple terminal program, in Delphi, that screen-scrapes the terminal window and sends the contents to a Python script, which then updates a web dashboard so that anyone with the URL can see what I see in my terminal program.