Chili, which some condsider Texas's state dish, was unknown in Mexico and derived from the ample use of beef in Texan cooking.

We tracked down the earliest print references for "burritos" cited by food history in American/English reference books. If fried, the burrito becomes a chimichanga." ---Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, John F. Not just tortillas, but huge regional tortillas, often well over twenty inches in diameter.

They are nothing like the burritos we are served today. Wrapped around some sort of filling, they are called burros or burritos, depending upon the size. If you deep-fry a burro it becomes a chimichanga--a truly local dish from Another Arizona or northern Sonora." ---Tucson's Mexican Restaurants, Suzanne Myal [Fiesta Publishing: Tucson AZ] 1997 (p.

Coe American Food: The Gastronomic Story, Evan Jones [chapter III "Padres and Conquistadores"] Cuisines of Mexico, Diana Kennedy Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, John F.

Mariani [separate entries for specific foods--fajita, tamale, chalupa...] Food Culture in Mexico, Long-Solis& Vargas The History of Food, Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, "The History of Cereals, Maize in the West" (pages 164-176) New Mexico Cooking: Southwestern Flavors of the Past and Present, Clyde Casey Oxford Companion to Food, Alan Davidson [Mexico] Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, Andrew J. Pilcher The Story of Corn, Betty Fussell You Eat What You Are, Thelma-Barer-Stein ("Mexico") The history of bunuelos and churros can be traced to ancient peoples.

Tex Mex restaurants first surfaced ouside the southwest region in cities with large Mexican populations. Diana Kennedy, noted Mexican culinary expert, is credited for elevating this common food to trendy fare. But it is foreign in that its inspiration came from an alien cuisine; that it has never merged into the mainstream of American cooking and remains alive almost solely in the region where it originated..." ---Eating in America, Waverly Root & Richard de Rochemont [William Morrow: New York] 1976 (p. A combination of the words "Texan" and "Mexican," first printed in 1945, that refers to an adaptation of Mexican dishes by Texas cooks.

It is difficult to be precise as to what distinguishes Tex-Mex from true Mexican food, except to say that the variety of the latter is wider and more regional, whereas throughout the state and, now, throughout the entire United States." ---Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, John F. 325) [1950s] "Mexican restaurants, whos popularity coincided with the arrival of large numbers of Mexican immigrants after 1950, have for the most part followed the from and style of what is called "Tex-Mex" food, and amalgam of Northern Mexican peasant food with Texas farm and cowboy fare.

342) [NOTE: this book has a recipe for churros, we can send you a copy if you like] RECOMMENDED READING: The Foods and Wines of Spain/Penelope Casas ---recipes for several different kinds of bunuelos; pages introducing desserts (p. Now a popular dish in many restaurants and taco stands in California and Texas are northern burritos, which are made by folding a flour tortilla around a mound of re-fried beans, seasoned to taste with chili." ---Oxford English Dictionary, 22nd edition Burros?

340-1) sum up the ingredients used and holiday connections. Our regional cookbooks confirm "burros" are indeed a larger version of "burritos" in Arizona and surrounding areas.

For the rest of the world, "Tex-Mex" had an exciting ring.